Year 3s Learn Indigenous Rope-Making Skills

Recently, our Year 3 students were given a first hand lesson in rope-making skills by local Wardandi man, Zac Webb.  Zac is a trained ranger, but he shared traditional techniques learned when he was their age, with the students and he explained how these grass ropes would have been used to form snares, belts or head garlands for girls.

Students were fascinated as he showed them just how to shred the reeds, then twist them into strong and very usable lengths of rope.  The experience was another example of how groups had to work collaboratively to succeed and how all the tools used came from the bush itself.

Zac was impressed with the students’ responses and he said,

…a big thank you for extending an invitation to come and speak about Boodja (Country) and gift some of my family’s cultural knowledge.  The Koolungas (kids) are amazing little people who soak up cultural information like sponges.

Some students’ comments were:
The most interesting thing I learned was that all of the Aboriginal people thought that their family members were all the trees, ants and animals around them.
One thing I am going to change is not to buy too many things because it is usually a waste. -Bonnie H from Room 5
The most interesting thing I learned was when Zacc showed us how to make rope from a reed and how to make a snare.
One thing I am going to change is to never be disrespectful.- Lilly G from Room 5
The most interesting thing I learned was how to make a trap.
One thing I am going to change is to pick up rubbish because it will help the environment. – Ricci M from Room 5
This incursion was organised by Tracey Muir of the Nature Conservation Margaret River Region Group as part of a program which explores sustainable environmental practices in action and was held at school in our special “Meeting Place” in the north-western corner of our school.
Written, photos and posted by D. Veary; Comments from Room 5 by R. Thomas

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One Response to Year 3s Learn Indigenous Rope-Making Skills

  1. Anonymous 21 September, 2017 at 6:03 am #

    Beautiful meeting place and noongar activity

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